ON THE MAYORS PLAN TO DEVELOP A GREEN VEHICLE POLICY

“We don't actually have a policy on this stuff. Obviously, this is something we should do,” said Gerbasi. According to the mayor's office, Winnipeg operates 400 transit buses, 350 police cars, 130 emergency vehicles and about 1,500 other vans, trucks and other specialized vehicles. Only a fraction of these vehicles -- including a hybrid diesel-electric bus -- are considered energy-efficient. A greener city fleet would bring Winnipeg in line with most other Canadian cities, said Gerbasi, who supports the mayor's environmental initiatives but remains critical of council's overall carbon dioxide-reduction strategy. “Winnipeg needs to rethink its land-use policy as it prepares to rewrite Plan Winnipeg, the city's development blueprint, and also must come up with a more comprehensive transit strategy,” Gerbasi said. The 2008 capital budget, which placed more emphasis on road repairs and extensions than it did on public transportation, did not adequately address climate-change concerns, she added. But she said the city should be praised for the positive steps it is taking. Winnipeg Free Press February 2, 2008